Declared 2016 



Veteran and Electrical Servicing Business Owner


Arthur Drew was born in the state of Pennsylvania, in a rural farming and industrial community. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the US Air Force, where he attended college while stationed in Washington state. He was also deployed for about a year to Vietnam. When his service was finished, he entered the private sector, initially focusing on aviation but eventually settling into the electrical servicing and manufacturing industry, in which he owned his own business.

Running as an Independent, Drew is critical of both Republican and Democratic policies, and he frequently speaks against President Obama's initiatives. He challenges the President's assertion that unemployment has dropped by nearly half since 2009, saying that their calculations flagrantly ignore those who have given up finding a job, and were made entirely for political gain. He also accuses the administration, and for that matter every administration and Congress in recent memory, of having service to corporate sector profits as their one and only goal.

Drew blames the phenomenon of outsourcing for the decline in American employment and the stagnation of domestic wages. He proposes the imposition of penalties on businesses that outsource labor overseas, with an emphasis on ensuring that these penalties cost more than a firm stands to save by shipping the jobs away. He also suggests using lower taxes, reduced interest loans, and other incentives to encourage companies to do business in the United States.

While he is sympathetic to environmental concerns and supports the Environmental Protection Agency's overall mission, Drew criticizes that agency's overly complex regulations, calling them confusing and saying they could leave private land owners unaware of whether they need to seek permits to modify their property. He calls for stronger oversight of the EPA to reduce its bureaucracy and provide clear, simple guidelines.

Drew is cautious on foreign policy, questioning American involvement in the Middle East and specifically against the terrorist group ISIS. He says that President Obama's commitment to help fight that organization will be felt well into his successor's administration, and he cautions that America's military should instead be used to secure the border at home.

Drew's strategy of using tax incentives to stimulate domestic business and industry is a conservative trait, while his support for government agencies like the EPA and his careful approach toward foreign policy are more leftist. As a result, most of his support is likely to be found among those in the center, who avoid politically veering far onto either side of the spectrum.
 
 
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2016 



Physician, Reformer, Environmental Activist
Born: May 14th, 1950  (age 67)


It would be a mistake to think that Jill Ellen Stein, the Green Party’s nominee for president, is a lightweight candidate for the 2016 presidential election. An August 2016 McClatchy/Marist national poll showed the Illinois native polling at 16% among Americans under the age of 30 – almost twice as many as Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump (9%). She also tied with Mr. Trump among undecided with 8%. Dr. Stein has clearly carved a following in the millennial voting demographic, which at 75.4 million, has surpassed the baby boomers as the largest living generation in the country.

The Harvard Medical School graduate, who also earned a B.A degree from Harvard College in 1973, spent about 25 years as a physician and researcher before transitioning into politics and social activism. Her first notable exposure to politics came in 1998 when she participated in the campaign to pass the Clean Elections Law in Massachusetts, a bill designed to reduce the influence of big-money lobbyists and special interest groups by limiting public money from being used to co-finance the political campaigns of candidates who refused to agree to a $100 contribution cap. However, five years later, the bill was repealed by the Democratic-controlled state legislature, a decision which prompted Dr. Stein to break her ties with the Democratic Party.

Her maiden run for public office came during the 2002 Massachusetts’ gubernatorial election, where under the banner of the Green-Rainbow Party, she finished third behind Republican Mitt Romney and Democrat Shannon O’Brien.

From the start, Dr. Stein’s core political philosophy has always been centered on the environment, renewable energy and campaign finance reform – issues that feature heavily in the Green New Deal, her pitch to the American people for the general election. The Green New Deal outlines her commitment to create “20 million living wage jobs that provide 100% clean renewable energy by 2030” while “reviving the economy, halting climate change, and making wars for oil obsolete.” Under Dr. Stein’s leadership, the Green Party will make a strong play in down-ballot races, with reportedly several hundred candidates contesting in Senate, House and state seats across the nation.

The high unfavorable ratings for both Mr. Trump and Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton has given her campaign a massive boost, and the Green Party is expected to appear on the ballots of up to 48 states and Washington D. C in this cycle, breaking the record of 2000 when Ralph Nader attained ballot access in 43 states.

Ms. Stein, the co-founder of the Massachusetts Coalition for Healthy Communities, is an avid musician and can play several musical instruments. She was also the lead vocalist for the folk-rock band, Somebody's Sister, which released four albums during the 90s (she sounds good, folks).

Campaign Ad , Green New Deal



 
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