Declared 2016 



Veteran and Electrical Servicing Business Owner


Arthur Drew was born in the state of Pennsylvania, in a rural farming and industrial community. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the US Air Force, where he attended college while stationed in Washington state. He was also deployed for about a year to Vietnam. When his service was finished, he entered the private sector, initially focusing on aviation but eventually settling into the electrical servicing and manufacturing industry, in which he owned his own business.

Running as an Independent, Drew is critical of both Republican and Democratic policies, and he frequently speaks against President Obama's initiatives. He challenges the President's assertion that unemployment has dropped by nearly half since 2009, saying that their calculations flagrantly ignore those who have given up finding a job, and were made entirely for political gain. He also accuses the administration, and for that matter every administration and Congress in recent memory, of having service to corporate sector profits as their one and only goal.

Drew blames the phenomenon of outsourcing for the decline in American employment and the stagnation of domestic wages. He proposes the imposition of penalties on businesses that outsource labor overseas, with an emphasis on ensuring that these penalties cost more than a firm stands to save by shipping the jobs away. He also suggests using lower taxes, reduced interest loans, and other incentives to encourage companies to do business in the United States.

While he is sympathetic to environmental concerns and supports the Environmental Protection Agency's overall mission, Drew criticizes that agency's overly complex regulations, calling them confusing and saying they could leave private land owners unaware of whether they need to seek permits to modify their property. He calls for stronger oversight of the EPA to reduce its bureaucracy and provide clear, simple guidelines.

Drew is cautious on foreign policy, questioning American involvement in the Middle East and specifically against the terrorist group ISIS. He says that President Obama's commitment to help fight that organization will be felt well into his successor's administration, and he cautions that America's military should instead be used to secure the border at home.

Drew's strategy of using tax incentives to stimulate domestic business and industry is a conservative trait, while his support for government agencies like the EPA and his careful approach toward foreign policy are more leftist. As a result, most of his support is likely to be found among those in the center, who avoid politically veering far onto either side of the spectrum.
 
 
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2016 



Businessman and former Governor of Massachusetts
Born: July 31st, 1945  (age 71)


William Floyd Weld is a man with a long and storied heritage. An ancestor was a Sheriff of London in the 14th century, three more were among the Pilgrims on board the Mayflower during its voyage to the New World, one was a founding donor of Harvard, another signed the Declaration of Independence, one more fought valorously in the Civil War – we could literally fill an entire page with the exploits of the Welds. If New England had a royal family, then the Welds must be sitting pretty close to the throne. In fact, the clan is one of the most influential among the Boston Brahmin.

It would’ve been so easy for Gov. Weld to simply coast along on his family name and wealth. But Gov. Weld was a man of principles, and for better or worse, he was also a political maverick. He was probably born a card-carrying Republican, but he never quite fit in with the party.

A couple of years after graduating from Harvard Law School (where else?) with a law degree in 1970, he served as a counsel with the House Judiciary Committee in Washington D.C. in preparation for impeachment proceeding against his own party leader, President Richard Nixon.

He returned to Massachusetts after that, and was very quickly promoted to District Attorney. He went on a rampage against corruption in the city, and even took down the Mayor of Boston. He was also a scourge of the banking industry. Gov. Weld’s record of 109 convictions out of 111 cases might have been a record of sorts - if only someone was keeping score.

The Reagan administration took notice of the hotshot lawyer, and President Ronald Reagan appointed him to head the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. For two years, Gov. Weld supervised all federal government investigations and prosecutions, in an out of the country. But he abruptly resigned in March 1988, and a few months later, testified in Congress against his boss, U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese, who was facing corruption charges.

Less than two years later, Weld ran for Governor of Massachusetts. The state GOP was slightly uncomfortable with the pro-marijuana decriminalization, pro-LGBT and pro-choice upstart (there were even reports that he was a member of the ACLU), but his socially liberal views proved popular with the Democratic base – so they threw their support behind him. In an interview with the Boston Globe, Gov. Weld remarked "On crime issues, I'm Attila the Hun […] There's no room to my right." It certainly helped that his competitor, John R. Silber, president of Boston University, infuriated his base with offensive comments about women and the LGBT community.

It wasn’t really a surprise when Weld won the election and became the first Republican Governor of Massachusetts in 25 years. Four years later, Gov. Weld won reelection by securing an incredible 71% of the vote – almost unheard of in modern top-level politics – especially in a state where Democrats outnumbered Republicans by four to one.

His new found confidence even saw him trying to remove the pro-life stance from the Republican platform during the 1996 Republican National Convention in San Diego. He failed, and his star dimmed a little. In 1996, Gov. Weld ran against heavyweight John Kerry for a seat in the U.S Senate, but that proved to be a bridge just a little too far.

In 1997, President Bill Clinton nominated Gov. Weld as U.S Ambassador to Mexico. But there were strong resistance from the Senate against his appointment. There were loud rumors that former Attorney General Ed Meese had a hand in it. Regardless, Gov. Weld didn’t even receive a hearing.

Gov. Weld then disappeared from the limelight, and aside from a failed run for Governor of New York in 2005, he only reappeared briefly in 2008 to endorse the then-Senator Barack Obama for president.

But he’s back now, as the Libertarian Party’s nominee for vice-president no less, and one suspects that this has always been the party of his heart.
 
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